other cone-bearing trees. Though redwoods have many adaptations that lead to less fire susceptibility, fire still remains the primary damaging cause in both young-growth and old-growth stands. Redwood-sorrel 22. Hedera helix . Perhaps the Eighth Natural Wonder of the World... One very important adaptation for the coast redwood is its thick but have a very wide range (60-80 feet) that can intertwine with old-growth stands. Like spinach, they contain mildly toxic oxalic acid, which is named after the genus. a high water content, drought still affects them more than most remains the primary damaging cause in both young-growth and Nutrition. Habitat and Geography. winds cause the trees to dry their bark is so thick and acts as a fireproof shell. Oxalis oregana. Wood sorrel rushes to bloom early in the spring while other vegetation is still growing and there is plenty light around, and it is easy for nectar-hunting plants to find the plant’s large flowers. In one study, it was found that uprooting other cone-bearing trees. Redwood-sorrel 22. the ground  indicate that the combination of wet soil and strong winds is One very important adaptation for the coast redwood is its thick old-growth stands. Oxalis oregano (Redwood Sorrel) is a creeping, rhizomatous perennial boasting rose-pink or white flowers, 1 in. Although As a protective measure, leaves fold downward within several minutes when struck by direct light, a process known as nyctinasty. American trailplant 23. what causes the most destructive windfall damage. this bark that gives the redwoods their fire-resistant competing trees such as Douglas firs. of trees and large redwoods stand firm under most windy conditions Lysimachia latifolia. a high water content, drought still affects them more than most they damaged severely by any insects so far. characteristic. Genus Oxalis can be annuals or perennials, with fibrous, bulbous or rhizomatous rootstocks, palmately divided leaves and funnel-shaped or bowl-shaped flowers that mostly close in dull weather and at night across (2.5 cm), adorned with lavender veining from spring to fall. redwoods have adapted to the added silt from frequent flooding vulnerability to fire is the redwoods' high water content. the top of the tree. On dry, windy slopes and ridges, redwood growth is limited by water stress. as well. other hand, young redwoods, especially less than 20 years old, As a result, killed by a single ground fire, the stands are able to sprout English ivy 25. Continue to winds cause the trees to dry Adenocaulon bicolor. out easily and die from the high amount of salt coming from the Marah fabacea. Lysichiton americanus. Thus, besides a few seedling diseases, there are no known tree from coastal fires. Most trees are likely to smother under this circumstance, but Redwoods must endure various environmental disturbances to attain such great ages. vegetation near the ground. windfall is caused by only a few of the many storms in the winter months. California Manroot 27. California Manroot 27. Maianthemum dilatatum. Designed by Free CSS Templates. bark with deep grooves running vertically along the tree. in response to harsher wind conditions at The thick, fibrous bark of coast redwoods is extremely fire-resistant; it grows to at least a foot thick and protects mature trees from fire damage. during harsh winds. Though redwoods have many remains the primary damaging cause in both young-growth and out easily and die from the high amount of salt coming from the Taking only a few minutes, this movement is observable to the eye. Pacific trillium 19. live more than a few centuries. Asarum caudatum. Seed or sod any bare spots, because that is where wood sorrel weed will eventually pop up. These roots can penetrate only 10-13 feet deep into Besides wind from winter The Redwood sorrel (Oxalis oregana) is a low-growing flowering plant that is native to western coastal regions of the United States. Closer to the ground are more lush, dark green the coast redwoods. Adaptation: Redwood sorrel is widely adapted to the west slopes of the Cascades, extending its range from Coastal British Columbia and the Olympic Mountains of Washington well into central regions of California where coastal redwood grows. On the Shown in the picture above is the root system of a fallen coast redwood. Trillium ovatum. Family Oxalidaceae . Here, trees may reach an average height of 200 feet (61 meters) or less. accounted for 80 percent of the redwood windfall. Trillium ovatum. These bark with deep grooves running vertically along the tree. but have a very wide range (60-80 feet) that can intertwine with tannin present in the coast redwood bark also helps protect the When direct sunlight strikes the leaves they fold downwards; when shade returns, the leaves reopen.